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The last patient of St Agatha’s

The night porter was too late. He’d heard the feeble clang of the old servants bell and had sped immediately to the sixth floor where he knew Dr Constantine to be conducting his rounds. The storm had presented many delays to the old man’s journey but, a kindly and good-hearted physician, he finally arrived and proceeded to creep from room to room, checking on the slumbering and dozing patients.

The nurses at St Agatha’s had named her Emily though the child herself had never spoken to identify herself. On leaving the hospital for the evening, her clothes claggy with the close evening heat, Sister Gould spotted something apparently foraging in the undergrowth of the hospital garden. She approached the animal, alarmed but not deterred by its wild thrashing in the foliage, and discovered it to be human; a small girl with tattered clothes and too many scrapes and cuts to count. Her eyes were balled so tightly that for a moment the sister assumed they were lost to her. The poor mite scrambled and cowered at the good nurse’s touch. She looked somehow harangued or even pursued by some unseen thing. As if she were scratching at the very ground to shelter from the horrid, plaguing presence.

The Sister knew the timing to be fortuitous for the storm was building to a tremendous crescendo overhead. She brought the girl in for warmth, food and fresh clothing. She was cleaned and a large, secure room was found. The young, wretched thing was made as comfortable as possible. The big oak door was locked for the child’s safety, with only the senior medical staff being in possession of a key.

At no point did she open her eyes, as if she were trapping something within her head; nor did she speak a word. On occasion, a weak but gutturral hiss would come forth from her throat. Coupled with this, the nurses observed how the eyeballs of the child convulsed and flicked from side to side under the thin lids and she writhed and struggled until the hissing had passed.

When he had finally surmounted the storm and arrived at his place of work, the Doctor threw himself through the hospital’s front door, peeled off his coat and immediately went about his rounds. Everything proceeded with a banal regularity and only the intrigue of the new patient kept the old man’s full attention.

An hour passed and the creaking grandfather clock in the staff quarters announced midnight . And moments afterwards, the servants bell began its bitter panic, summoning the night porter.

Upon arriving at the room where Emily had been housed, the porter found the door wide open; nor was the girl anywhere to be found within. The Doctor lay on the ground, groaning. His throat was slick with blood from the many tears and gashes that decorated it. He gurgled and a strange, brown foam had collected about his mouth. One of the porters knelt beside him to listen to his attempts at words. A crack of thunder drowned the language out.

“Doctor, where is the child?”
“Child…!” the doctor tried.
“Yes sir. Where is little Emily? Is she safe from harm sir?”
“The thing….” There was a dreadful pause.

The porter thought the old man dead and feared awfully for poor Emily’s safety. What manner of creature had taken her?

“The thing … in that room …” Again, sound and light ricocheted around the old building. Finally, the Doctor summoned his final reserves of energy and shrieked out with staggering volume: 

“THE THING…IN THAT ROOM…IS NOT A CHILD!”

Another crack of thunder and a startling flash of lightning illuminated every hallway; a hundred fuses were shorted in a single instant.

The hospital was plunged into darkness.

The night porter felt the Doctor stiffen in his arms; heard his final groans and some ghastly rattle from deep inside him. And then, silence.

Somewhere, over his shoulder in the darkness of the ancient corridor, a sound infected the porter’s ear; the growing, clinging menace of an animal-like hiss… 

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